Anna (2013) – By Philip Smolen

John Washington (Mark Strong) is a mind detective. Simply by holding hands with another person, he can see their memories clearly which can help solve the most troubling police cases. Unfortunately, this ability has already cost him his beloved wife, because she wasn’t able to deal with the death of their son and constantly wanted John to make her feel the wonderful memories of the boy again and again. Shattered by her suicide, John tries to pick up the pieces of his life. He goes back to the company that employed him which is run by Sebastian (the great Brian Cox). Sebastian takes pity on John and assigns him a simple case; a teenage girl named Anna (Taissa Farmiga) who won’t eat. John arrives at Anna’s estate and meets her rich mother (Saskia Reeves) and her step father (Richard Dillane). The step father believes that Anna should be institutionalized because of ‘other’ instances that have happened in her life. But after John joins minds with Anna, he begins to see that there is much more behind her behavior than just refusing to eat. Anna is deeply troubled and John is determined to help her.

“Anna” is a new complex psychological thriller from director Jorge Dorado and writer Guy Holmes. It seems to take its inspiration from Christopher Nolan’s “Inception” (2010) since it also deals with memories. But instead of creating new worlds for the mind, Dorado and Homes focus on the lasting emotional impact of memories and how they shape our future. John’s memories have forever changed him, and after losing his wife, he is not about to let Anna be committed to a mental institution. He decides that this young girl is worth fighting for and he becomes her champion. But, the mystery is Anna herself. Is she being truthful with John?

The film is moody and noirish and Dorado and Holmes keep you guessing about everyone and everything. All the performances are excellent and the music by Lucas Vidal enhances the film’s creepy and unsettling feeling.

As with most films of this type, you have to be patient in order to be rewarded. The film starts out slow as Dorado and Holmes fill in all the necessary details. But just like John, I found myself hooked and wanted to know the truth about Anna and her family. I was not disappointed.

“Anna” is a tense and satisfying psychological thriller that keeps you thinking and guessing until its riveting final frames. It’s a solid suspense flick that delivers on what it promises.

For more information on Anna, please visit:   John Washington (Mark Strong) is a mind detective. Simply by holding hands with another person, he can see their memories clearly which can help solve the most troubling police cases. Unfortunately, this ability has already cost him his beloved wife, because she wasn’t able to deal with the death of their son and constantly wanted John to make her feel the wonderful memories of the boy again and again. Shattered by her suicide, John tries to pick up the pieces of his life. He goes back to the company that employed him which is run by Sebastian (the great Brian Cox). Sebastian takes pity on John and assigns him a simple case; a teenage girl named Anna (Taissa Farmiga) who won’t eat. John arrives at Anna’s estate and meets her rich mother (Saskia Reeves) and her step father (Richard Dillane). The step father believes that Anna should be institutionalized because of ‘other’ instances that have happened in her life. But after John joins minds with Anna, he begins to see that there is much more behind her behavior than just refusing to eat. Anna is deeply troubled and John is determined to help her.

“Anna” is a new complex psychological thriller from director Jorge Dorado and writer Guy Holmes. It seems to take its inspiration from Christopher Nolan’s “Inception” (2010) since it also deals with memories. But instead of creating new worlds for the mind, Dorado and Homes focus on the lasting emotional impact of memories and how they shape our future. John’s memories have forever changed him, and after losing his wife, he is not about to let Anna be committed to a mental institution. He decides that this young girl is worth fighting for and he becomes her champion. But, the mystery is Anna herself. Is she being truthful with John?

The film is moody and noirish and Dorado and Holmes keep you guessing about everyone and everything. All the performances are excellent and the music by Lucas Vidal enhances the film’s creepy and unsettling feeling.

As with most films of this type, you have to be patient in order to be rewarded. The film starts out slow as Dorado and Holmes fill in all the necessary details. But just like John, I found myself hooked and wanted to know the truth about Anna and her family. I was not disappointed.

“Anna” is a tense and satisfying psychological thriller that keeps you thinking and guessing until its riveting final frames. It’s a solid suspense flick that delivers on what it promises.

For more information on Anna, please visit: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1715336