Psycho Cop Returns (1993) – By Baron Craze

 

Sometimes it’s fun to revisit a horror movie from the early 1990s, which seems a tad leftover from the 80s, especially one so over-the-top, that recently earned a polished look from Vinegar Syndrome on Blu-Ray with a special cover-artwork and many bells and whistles to boot. Even if you never saw the first part, Psycho Cop (1989), the sequel provides enough understanding of what’s occurring and less important they why, after all it’s a horror slasher flick. Director Adam Rifkin, known for his films The Invisible Maniac (1990) and Director’s Cut (2016), helmed this trashy extremely low budget shot in one week on an entire office-building floor, all of it after hours. The lead role of Satanic Officer Joe Vickers (Robert R. Shafer) steals the entire movie, with more snappy one-liners than character Dirty Harry ever did in his career.

It starts with devil-worshipping police officer Joe Vickers (Shafer) overhearing the illegal acts of snobbish businessmen Larry (Rod Sweitzer) and Brian (Miles Dougal) discuss for a bachelor party for Gary (Dave Bean) with strippers, booze, and drugs all occurring at work afterhours while their cranky boss leaves for the night. For a proper slasher movie one needs a big count, especially when a sequel, therefore sneaking in the strippers Julie Strain, Melanie good, and Maureen Flaherty as Stephanie, Cindy and Lisa respectively, as well as a few others at office such as Barbara Niven (Sharon). Rifkin adds in lots of hijinks and nudity wondering what floor of this actual office building had this much mayhem occurring on it, help or hinder the future renting of floor space. Vickers, looks crazed (his squad car littered with body parts, blood and satanic symbols, a tad incriminating, follows the loudmouth duo to the workplace , only to return later and put forth punishments of the crimes by using a pencil, ax, an elevator, and his service pistol (a tad too much for a brutal slayer). Understand Vickers says many silly things such as “you have the right to remain dead,” but it all goes to show the audience fun movie filled with cornball elements, never going for the creep-out factors. Now the movie does contain a final girl sequence, a requirement but not to ruin it, not telling who it is; however, very easy to guess the person. A scene in the movie, which does occur, perhaps troubling for some, includes the clubbing, beating, and kicking of Vickers in the street by a group of assistants (actually heroes on the scene to help), the savagery of the it might remind some of the Rodney King video from 1991.

One must know the movie took a beating from the infamous MPAA due to their excessive and demoralizing attitude to horror films in general and sentence Psycho Cop Returns to the hard labor of cutting object able scenes. Aside from that, a great movie to enjoy, check the disbelief at the door, get comfortable, and let the outrageousness fly free. Although rough around the edges, and lacking the customary blood and gore, of the heyday of the 80s, the lack of political correctness a found treasure, which a few other independent companies of today follow closely. The casting for the movie went to interesting portions, such as the discovery of Brittany Ashland (who starred in a few adult films) and Sara Lee Froton, the go-go dancers in adult movie playing in the background, were strippers at Charlie Sheen’s bachelor party. One needs to rethink their cubical hell, next time at work, and envision the insanity of it transformed into both a staging area to prep and special effects, to insane parties, and freaky heated copy room scene, never be able to look at your workplace the same again, Thanks Rifkin.

While this reviewer, saw part one a long time ago, it didn’t stop from viewing this sequel, a good treat for horror fans, who truly love the genre, whether good or bad, just seeking something a tad different. I viewed the Vinegar Syndrome limited edition O-card (outside slipcover) designed by Chris Garofalo (who also did the cover for The Hearse) to the first 1,666 copies the connection to artwork of the badge number 666.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107894