Wolfcop Issue #1 (2016) – By Baron Craze

 

Director and writer Lowell Dean, known for his film 13 Eerie (2013), delivers a well-respected and lycanthropy tale, called Wolfcop (2014) of just what it sounds, a police officer, who enjoys his donuts, alcohol and blasting bad guys with his gun and the power of a werewolf. The Canadian horror comedy tale very much welcomed begged for a sequel, Another Wolfcop, which the artwork paid homage to Sylvester Stallone’s Cobra (1986). Hence, the creation of a three issue comic book of the same name, and the first issue called “Volume 1: Hog Wild” penned by writer Max Marks (who never worked on any other comic before or since this series), along with Arcana Studios handling the artist duties. Lowell Dean stayed on board for story editing and his tremendously wonderfully Wolfcop character making sure justice gets served properly. First, if one is not a fan of the film, then this comic’s appeal contains zero positive influence for you, since it follows the intensity of the movie, filled with silliness, splatter, violence and comical dialogue. Still unsure think of an action hero star meets a horror beastie in an alley for a rumble and what walks out becomes a hybrid of both. Dynamite Entertainment released the comics, which, first came out at October 26, 2016 for the cost of $3.99, and now sought over collector’s item for the die-hard fans of the movie.

The Wolfcop hero takes driving out of town on the road with his buddy Willie but find some trouble, from a vicious biker and once a law enforcer always one, the justice must dish forcefully to the criminals in life. Definitely a quick read, fully in color in rich and the violence, easy flow of panel’s precision the storytelling. Honestly, the comic appeals to a very tiny portion of horror comic audience, which hence limited the support for the issues, but the ridiculousness of them but some negative criticism and the lack of experience of the Marks added to the remarks.

I found the comic a thoroughly enjoyable read, and full of exploitation, with a cover that reminds of the heyday of b-movie horror, highlighting the wonderful pandemonium excelled with excessive gore and all for the entertainment of the hardcore passionate fans.